MIDWAY: Cayman Turtle Centre

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At the Hatchery at the Cayman Turtle Centre, turtle eggs are harvested from the farm's sandy beach and brought to the hatchery. A display of live eggs hatching can be seen in the lower left. (Keith Horinek/The Capital-Journal)

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Adult sea turtles can weigh up to 400 pounds. The turtles are 15 years old before their sex is determined with males developing a long tail and females having short tails. (Keith Horinek/The Capital-Journal)

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The turtles are raised in concrete tanks for most of their juvenile lives. When they reach adulthood they are either released in the wild or consumed for their meat. Some adult turtles are kept for breeding purposes for the farm. (Keith Horinek/The Capital-Journal)

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Guests are permitted to touch the juvenile turtles with help from turtle farm guides. (Keith Horinek/The Capital-Journal)

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Guests are permitted to touch the juvenile turtles with help from turtle farm guides. (Keith Horinek/The Capital-Journal)

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Adult green sea turtles live in a pond at the farm. There they have access to a sandy beach where they lay their eggs. (Keith Horinek/The Capital-Journal)

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The Cayman Turtle Centre’s Visitor Center located in West Bay, Grand Cayman. (Keith Horinek/The Capital-Journal)

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Cayman Turtle Centre, established in 1968 is located in West Bay, Grand Cayman. (Keith Horinek/The Capital-Journal)

Description

The British-controlled Cayman Islands comprise three islands — Grand Cayman, Cayman Brac and Little Cayman — 275 miles south of Cuba. With a population of about 60,750, tourism has a major impact on the economy.

Cayman Turtle Centre, established in 1968, is in West Bay, Grand Cayman. It is used for breeding and raising the endangered green sea turtle and has become a research center and tourist attraction.

As the largest land-based attraction in the Cayman Islands the farm welcomes more than 500,000 visitors annually.

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