Midway: Rock Chalk renewal

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A crane brings down one of four hand-carved grotesques from the exterior of Dyche Hall on the University of Kansas campus. The grotesques have been on the building since 1903 and are being removed due to "serious erosion." The KU Natural History Museum, which is inside Dyche Hall, will hire an artist to make carved replicas of them to be put in their place. (Chris Neal/The Capital-Journal)

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A crane brings down one of four hand-carved grotesques from the exterior of Dyche Hall on the University of Kansas campus. The grotesques have been on the building since 1903 and are being removed due to "serious erosion." The KU Natural History Museum, which is inside Dyche Hall, will hire an artist to make carved replicas of them to be put in their place. (Chris Neal/The Capital-Journal)

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A crane brings down one of four hand-carved grotesques from the exterior of Dyche Hall on the University of Kansas campus. The grotesques have been on the building since 1903 and are being removed due to "serious erosion." The KU Natural History Museum, which is inside Dyche Hall, will hire an artist to make carved replicas of them to be put in their place. (Chris Neal/The Capital-Journal)

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Construction crews bring four hand-carved grotesques into the loading dock of Dyche Hall after removing them from the exterior of the building. The grotesques have been on the building since 1903 and are being removed due to "serious erosion." The KU Natural History Museum, which is inside Dyche Hall, will hire an artist to make carved replicas of them to be put in their place. (Chris Neal/The Capital-Journal)

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A crated hand-carved grotesque is rolled into a freight elevator in Dyche Hall after being removed them from the exterior of the building. The grotesques have been on the building since 1903 and are being removed due to "serious erosion." The KU Natural History Museum, which is inside Dyche Hall, will hire an artist to make carved replicas of them to be put in their place. (Chris Neal/The Capital-Journal)

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A crated hand-carved grotesque is rolled into a freight elevator in Dyche Hall after being removed them from the exterior of the building. The grotesques have been on the building since 1903 and are being removed due to "serious erosion." The KU Natural History Museum, which is inside Dyche Hall, will hire an artist to make carved replicas of them to be put in their place. (Chris Neal/The Capital-Journal)

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In 1963, these hand-carved grotesque were removed from Dyche Hall before adding the expansion to the North side of the building. Four other grotesques, that had been on the building since 1903, are being removed due to "serious erosion." The KU Natural History Museum, which is inside Dyche Hall, will hire an artist to make carved replicas of them to be put in their place. (Chris Neal/The Capital-Journal)

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Construction crews bring the crated hand-carved grotesques into the main gallery of the the KU Natural History Museum, inside Dyche Hall, where they will be put on display. The grotesques have been on the building since 1903 and were removed due to "serious erosion." The museum will hire an artist to make carved replicas of them to be put in their place. (Chris Neal/The Capital-Journal)

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Construction crews remove one of four hand-carved grotesques from the exterior of Dyche Hall on the University of Kansas campus. The grotesques have been on the building since 1903 and are being removed due to "serious erosion." The KU Natural History Museum, which is inside Dyche Hall, will hire an artist to make carved replicas of them to be put in their place. (Chris Neal/The Capital-Journal)

Description

On Friday, Sept. 1, half of the fantastical limestone animals that had adorned Dyche Hall on the University of Kansas’s campus for 114years were removed to be preserved in the Panorama Gallery of the KU Natural History Museum.

Four of the 3-foot limestone creatures have been taken to the gallery, and once construction is complete, the scaffolding on the West andSouth side of the building will move to the North and East side, and those statues will be removed.

This project is part of a $4.2 million renovation funded by the state of Kansas. The grotesques, created by Joseph Frazee at the turn oflast century, will eventually be re-created by a new artist. Bids for the project are currently underway.

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