Want to know what local government entity maintains your street or road? There’s a map for that

This photo shows the results of a search conducted on an interactive map recently made available on Shawnee County’s website that enables people to determine who is responsible for maintaining the road or street at any place within Shawnee County. This particular search targeted 1515 N.W. Saline, the site of the county’s North Annex, and determined it is on a street or road maintained by the city of Topeka. (Tim Hrenchir/The Capital-Journal)

An interactive map recently made available on Shawnee County’s website enables people to determine who is responsible for maintaining the street or road at any site within the county, commissioners learned Monday.

 

The map allows residents to type in an address or click on a location to learn which governing entity maintains the street or road there, said Lee Allen, the county’s geographic information systems mapping coordinator.

Government entities maintaining streets and roads include the city of Topeka, Shawnee County and the 12 townships located in unincorporated areas within the county’s borders.

Allen said the map can be accessed by going to the county’s website at www.snco.us, clicking on “interactive maps” beneath “Appraiser’s Office,” then using the “find address” function on the site’s “road maintenance contacts” page.

Allen, county counselor Jim Crowl and public works director Tom Vlach teamed up to give commissioners Bob Archer, Kevin Cook and Shelly Buhler a presentation at their morning meeting regarding county and township roads.

Commissioners said constituents living in the unincorporated areas sometimes call their office asking who is responsible for maintaining their street or road.

Shawnee County and the 12 townships are separate units of government, with townships being independent of counties, Crowl said.

The county commission lacks authority to remove township officers, though it temporarily appoints replacements when officers leave township boards, he said.

The county and townships maintain separate roadway systems, Vlach said.

The county lacks the authority to tell townships what to do with their roads unless the county engineer thinks an accident is imminent and requires repairs to be made, he said, and lacks authority to mandate what type of surface a township-maintained road will have.

He added that residents with issues regarding township-maintained roads can’t appeal township board decisions to the county because “we are not an appeals court.”

Contact reporter Tim Hrenchir at (785) 295-1184 or @timhrenchir on Twitter.

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